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20121101
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to the american people. >> schieffer: mccain will be with us this morning, and we'll also get the take of the senate's number two democrat, dick durbin. for analysis we'll bring in the "washington post's" david ignatius. tom ricks, august of can the gen. and our own bob orr and margaret brennan. and we'll have a farewell interview with maine's republican senator olympia snowe, who's leaving the senate because she no longer felt it was a place she could get anything done. it's been a wild week, but we'll try to put it in perspective on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. we want to get right to the story in the middle east. , israel continuing to amass troops on the period with gaza. three israelis are dead, more than 50 wounded by rocket fire. the airstrikes go on. the question now, will the israelis send their ground troops into gaza? we're going first this morning to alan pizzey who is in tel aviv. allen. >> reporter: good morning, bob. overnight the israelis continued
book. i don't want to give away too much of it. so i'll let you tell us. but it is the story-- it is a thriller but it's told in a very unusual way, and basically, it's about trust in a marge that sort of went wrong. >> it's about nick and amy dunn. they're a married couple, and amy goes missing on her five-year anniversary, and it starts with that very basic premise, but the story is told as kind of a he said/she said sort of story. so it's told from nick's point of view, on the day she goes missing and as he quickly starts to become a person of interest, we don't know where amy is and what happened to her. and through amy, through diary entries from the first days of their courtship to the days she's missing, and we come to quickly understand these two not entirely reliable narrator, and you're going to have to sift through and decide who to believe. >> schieffer: that was the part of the book. who am i pulling for in this book as it unfolds. why do you think it was so popular? it went right to the top. >> it's a twisting mystery, but it also has a basis, kind of gender rel
physics, and, yes, he fooled us and he'll fool you, too. how did you do that? we were all about books this morning, just like another washington shopper this weekend. >> we're going to get those. >> okay. >> schieffer: because this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. well, just hours after helping negotiate the cease-fire between the israelis and hamas, egyptian president mohamed morsi declared more power for himself and said he was immune to judicial oversight. that has set off violent protests between morsi's muslim brotherhood, and the opposition parties. police used terd gas in cairo yesterday. more than 500 have been injured and egypt's judicial branch is joining with the opposition in protest. both sides have announced plans for major protests in cairo on tuesday. cbs news correspondent holly williams is in cairo this morning. holly, what can you tell synonymous. >> reporter: well, bob, what we're seeing here today in central cairo is violent clashes. they're fi
enough that i think many of us are going to wait and see what-- how the vote counting goes. >> schieffer: anthony, you do all this work for cbs news. you're in charge of our poll and all of that. how do you see this thing breaking down? what do you, the closest of the battleground states are right now? >> certainly, certainly virginia is neck and neck. that's a toss-up. i think colorado is razor close. i think wisconsin is really close walz. you know, we talk a lot about ohio. it's obviously critical. but let's not forget somebody has to take two or three, i think, of those, also, to get over the top. you know, stewart said something interesting, too, that i want to pick up on about these polls-- because all of this is about those state polls. so much of the argument this year has been about the composition of the polls, which means the composition of the electorate. there are too many older folks, too many young, too many democrates, too many republicans. but i think that tells you all of this comes down to turnout. the pollsters are trying to get a handle on-- everybody is trying to ge
of the best political remembers, analysts and race watchers to give us their take on the presidential race. we'll start with peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." dee dee myers of "vanity fair." richard lowry of the "national review." harvard university's david gergen. and our own john dickerson. then we'll talk to stu rothenberg of the stu rothenbe rothenberg political reports. allen stanford of the university of virginia center for politics, democratic pollster anna greenberg, and republican analyst leslie sanchez of the impacto group. and our own cbs news elections director anthony salvanto. we're coming to the end of the campaign 2012, and we've got it all on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. most of the country is looking forward to election day, or at the least, looking forward to the campaign being over. but in large parts of the northeast, it is still the aftermath of the storm that is in the forefront of many people's thoughts. at least 110 are dead, more than 2 mill
this behind us. >> schieffer: senator, thank you so much. and now we're going to get the other side of this picture. and joining us now, one of the architects of the president's victory, his senior campaign adviser, david axelrod, who is out in chicago. mr. axelrod, thank you so much for joining us. let me just start, on friday, the president said he was open to compromise, but he said he would not accept any approach to deficit reduction, that does not ask the wealth tow pay more taxes. speaker boehner, the republican speaker of the house, has already said that's a nonstarter. aren't we right back where we were last year? >> well, i don't think so, bob, for a am could you have reasons. first of all, i think the speaker also said he wasn't going to get into details about what he would or wouldn't accept. he didn't want to foreclose discussions, and that was a positive sign. his rhetoric has been encouraging. and i think we have also had an intervening election, and in fact the position of the president articulated friday was the position that he's articulated throughout the campaign
in the economy that hurt people in the middle class. he was using outsourcing. they were using offshoring. they were painting him as the kind of bad guy that led to the economic situation people are in. >> schieffer: it seems to me in the beginning they just made a streamic mistake about ohio. why would you go and campaign against the auto bailout in a place where it worked, where they put people back to work? that seems like an odd way to go about it. i don't think it's the polling in the end that they didn't understand. i mean, that-- why would you use that? that was-- that was the thrust of their message out there. the auto bailout was wrong. >> yeah, well, they thought-- what confused them a little bit is they thought it's about independence in ohio. and we're doing well. they targeted independents, knocked on their doors. these are people who hadn't participated in the primaries of either party, and they were winning with those independents. a senior strategist said to me, fmitt romney loses ohio, i'll give you $1,000 to your favorite charity for every point he wins among independent
their elected officials to work together. >> schieffer: senator i want to thank you for being with us this morning. i want to wish you the best of luck, and washington wil will be less because are you no longer a member of the senate. we wish you well. >> thank you, bob, very much, for those kind words. >> schieffer: and we'll be back in one minute. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >> schieffer: well, there's been a lot going on in was
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)